Posts Tagged: Marion Indiana history

Israel Jenkins House

The Elms Station of Farmington. Tour this beautifully renovated 1840s National Register property with ties to the Underground Railroad. The Jenkins House is a ‘Hoosier Homestead’ and is listed on the ‘Indiana Historic Sites and Structures’ . Presently the house serves as the Clubhouse for the Club Run Golf Course, including sandwich and Pub fare during golf season. The second floor includes a Museum of historical artifacts of the families and the area. The Jenkins house is open daily during golf season until 6:00pm. Enjoy the historic golf display in the Jenkins Golfhouse Golf Museum. The owners wish to share… Read more »

Marion National Cemetery

Serene, peaceful resting place for many veterans of many wars. Henry Smith, a Civil War veteran, was the first to be buried here on May 29, 1890. In 1888, Colonel George W. Steele, Indiana’s congressional representative, successfully convinced his colleagues in Washington, D.C., of the need for a Soldier’s Home in Grant County. Subsequently, the 31-acre Marion Branch of the National Home opened in 1889 to provide shelter and comfort for the region’s veterans. Along with the home, a cemetery was established for the interment of the men who died there.  For most of its history, the cemetery at the… Read more »

Marion Public Library & Museum

The museum houses a large display of artifacts and memorabilia from the history of Grant County, Indiana. History Made Here exhibit highlights the natural gas boom in East Central Indiana, and its effects on Grant County communities. Exhibits include a 1952 Crosley Super Sport car, which was produced in Marion, Indiana. A Victorian exhibit showcases the McClure cabinet, the Marion sweeper and the Marion stove, all manufactured in Marion. Advance notice for large groups, please.

Miami Indian Cemetery

The Miami Indian Cemetery is the largest Indian Cemetery in Indiana. Established in the mid-1800s on the Miami Indian reservation, it is the burial site of Chief Meshingomesia and members of his tribe. The land was deeded to the Miami by the United States in the Treaty of 1840. Historic Miami Indian schoolhouse also located at this site.

Mississinewa 1812 Battlefield

The Mississinewa Battlefield was the site of the first victory of the United States Army during the War of 1812, on December 17-18, 1812. A 600-man mounted force led by Lt. Col. John B. Campbell attacked and destroyed four British-allied Indian villages. Site of the annual Mississinewa 1812 living history event. Located 7 miles North of Marion on State Road 15.

VA Marion Campus

The VA Northern Indiana Health Care System, Marion Campus (formerly the Marion VA Medical Center) is on the national historic register and provides quality care to veterans of America, as it has for over a century. It is located on 144 park-like acres in southeastern Marion. Officially opened in March 1890, the first residents of the home were Union soldiers who volunteered for the military during the Civil War.